The City of Granada-Federico García Lorca International Prize
for Poetry is a subject I have blogged on on a number of occasions previously: #post45, #post 43, #post 39, #post 24, #post 5 for example.

The latest winner (for 2014) was
Granada’s very own Rafael Guillén, born in
1933, so 81 when he got the prize; member of the Generation of the 50s, one of
the most important poets of his generation, etc; with an assortment of awards,
though not (yet) the Reina Sofia.

Rafael Guillén was one of the
poets who emerged with the group “Versos al aire libre” in post-War
Granada. He remained prominent in the local cultural scene and finally managed
with other local authors, most notably Elena Martín Vivaldi and Antonio
Carvajal, to get the Academia de Buenas Letras de Granada set up in 2001.

I got this from the official Premio Internacional de Poesia Ciudad de
Granada/Federico Garcia Lorca http://www.premiogarcialorca.es/actividades.htm

In the course of my blogging I
would try to define and refine the profile of a Lorca Prize winner and sometimes tried –
without any success – to predict the next year’s winner.

First of all, the average age of
the award winner is 80. Secondly, six have been from Spain and five from Latin
America, if we count Tomas Segovia as a Mexican. So that’s fairly evenly
balanced. But if we look more closely at those broad categories, we find that
no less than four of the Spaniards were Andalusians and three of
the Latinos Mexicans. Look at this overview:

YEAR

WINNER

AGE

Reina Sofia

OTHER

FROM

2014

Rafael
Guillen

81

Andalucia

2013

Eduardo
Lizalde

84

Mexico

2012

Pablo
Garcia Baena

89

2008

Principe
de Asturias

Andalucia

2011

Fina
Garcia Marruz

88

2011

Pablo
Neruda

Cuba

2010

María
Victoria Atencia,

79

2014

Andalucia

2009

Jose
Manuel Caballero

83

2004

Cervantes

Andalucia

2008

Tomas
Segovia

81

Juan Rulfo

Spain/Mexico

2007

Francisco
Brines

75

2010

Spain

2006

Blanca
Leonor Varela

80

2007

Octavio
Paz

Peru

2005

José
Emilio Pacheco

66

2009

Cervantes

Mexico

2004

Angel
Gonzalez

79

1996

Principe
de Asturias

Spain

We see that eight of the winners
also won the Reina Sofia; three of them had already won it, four of them would
win it later, and one, Fina Garcia Marruz, won them both in the same year,
2011. Otherwise, nearly all of them have won other important awards, including
the Cervantes on two occasions.

Just three of the winners have
been lady poets: two Latinas and one Andaluza.

So, down to the predictions for
the next Award. Isn’t it a woman’s turn? And possibly-probably Latin America’s.
Only three countries are represented among the five Latin American winners (Mexico, Peru, Cuba). So maybe it’s the turn of another country.

The winner
may well be among the 41 poets who were nominated for this year’s prize but
lost out to Granada’s Guillen. Among those names are two I have considered as
potential winners in previous blogs. One is Ernesto Cardenal of Nicaragua. Once
I thought he might be too radical, having been Minister of Culture with the
Sandanista Government between 1979 and 1988. However, he recently won the Reina
Sofía, which puts him in with a good chance for the City of Granada. The other
is Chilean, Nicanor Parra Sandoval, who at 101 years of age has probably
outlived his usefulness for the Award.

Among
the 41 there are 9 women. As I reckon it must be a woman’s turn, if I have time I am
going to study the form for a future blog.